"Stormwater runoff occurs when precipitation from rain or snowmelt flows over the land surface. Stormwater can soak into the soil (infiltrate), be held on the surface and evaporate, or runoff and end up in nearby streams, rivers, or other water bodies (surface water).

The addition of roads, driveways, parking lots, rooftops and other surfaces that prevent water from soaking into the ground to our landscape greatly increases the runoff volume created during storms.

In natural landscapes such as forests, the soil absorbs much of the stormwater and plants help hold stormwater close to where it falls. In developed environments, unmanaged stormwater can create two major issues: one related to the volume and timing of runoff water (flooding) and the other related to potential contaminants that the water is carrying (water pollution)."

Municipalities located in urban areas as defined by the Census Bureau are required to obtain NPDES permit coverage for discharges from their municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s). Municipalities located outside of urbanized areas may need to comply within 180 days notice or as determined by the NPDES Permitting Authority.

Beginning on March 10, 2003, construction sites that disturb one acre or more are required to have coverage under the NPDES general permit for stormwater discharges from construction site activities.

Municipalities under 100,000 population will no longer be exempt from the construction site stormwater requirements and the industrial stormwater requirements effective March 10, 2003. (WWTPs 1.0 mgd or more will need a General Stormwater Permit for Industrial Activities) Definition of industrial stormwater has been revised to expand the "no-exposure" exemption to all industrial categories except construction. NEW Electronic Submission of Notice of Intent is now available for Construction Sites and Industrial Activities. Please click on the Construction or Industrial Links for further information.
Rain Barrels / Cisterns

Rain Barrels / Cisterns

Rain barrels are designed to accumulate and store runoff from small to moderate storms. A rain barrel is composed of a large drum, hose, pipe and hose couplings, a screen grate and other off the shelf items. Rain barrels can be purchased from garden supply stores or they can be easily built with supplies purchased from a hardware store. Information on where to purchase a rain barrel or assembling one yourself can easily be found online.
Learn More!
Rain Gardens

Rain Gardens

Rain gardens are one of the many BMPs that you can implement at home to reduce the impacts of stormwater in your watershed. Building a rain garden is one of the simplest, easiest and most cost effective ways you can protect water quality at home. The purpose of a rain garden at home is to store and promote the infilitration of rainfall into the groundwater. Without the rain garden, the majority of the rain that falls onto the impervious surfaces around your home.
Learn More!
Stormwater Trees

Stormwater Trees

Trees are one of the simplest and most cost effective ways or reducing stormwater runoff from impervious area such as parking lots, roads, and buildings. Trees have an effect on stormwater above the ground surface, at the ground surface, and below the ground surface.   First rain is caught on the trees' leves, branches, and trunk slowing the movement of stormwater.  Portions of this intercepted rainfall is evaporated from the foliage and released back into the atmosphere as vapor.
Learn More!